“Match Point” Review

matchpointMatch Point (2005)

As some of my readers will know, especially those based in the UK, last Sunday was the men’s final of the Wimbledon Championships 2017, the oldest and, certainly, most prestigious tennis tournament in the world. This got me thinking about films which reference tennis, and I decided to review Woody Allen’s “Match Point“. In this film, Chris Wilton (Jonathan Rhys-Meyers), an ex tennis pro, comes from humble background, but slowly makes his way to the society’s upper class by dating and then marrying the sister of one of his students at a posh tennis club in London. However, this is all far from being a plain-sailing feat for Chris, because along the way he gets entangled with a seeming femme fatale and a starting actress Nola Rice (Scarlett Johansson), who may as well bring his undoing. If I did not know that this was Woody Allen’s film, I would never have guessed. This film not only plays like a cheap and dull TV soap opera for most of its time, it is also filled with pretensions and clichés regarding the lives of upper classes in London; has a list of totally unlikable characters; and is totally devoid of humour.  Read more of this post

Film Review: A Ghost Story (2017) — Film Blerg

A-GHOST-STORY-via-A24

A Ghost Story” (2017) reunites director David Lowery with Rooney Mara and Casey Affleck. I gave a very high score to the director’s previous film “Ain’t Them Bodies Saints” (2013), involving these actors, because it won me over with its embedded poeticism and creativity alone; see my review of “Ain’t Them Bodies Saints here, and/or read a fair take on “A Ghost Story” by Film Blerg below: 

Films about ghosts are usually scary, jumpy and spine-tingling. David Lowery’s latest feature, A Ghost Story, carefully avoids boxing itself within the horror genre by proving itself an elusive poem on topics as various as life and death, time and perception, and the purpose of human and universal existence. Without doubt, it is one of…

via Film Review: A Ghost Story (2017) — Film Blerg

The “No, YOU’RE Crying!” Blogathon: Head in the Clouds (2004)

tearjerker6Debbie at Moon in Gemini is hosting the “No, YOU’RE Crying!” Blogathon, and I thought I would be part of that amazing film race. It is great when a film is so powerful emotionally that it makes you cry, even though there may not be many films out there who possess this enviable quality. Of course, some films are heart-breaking in themselves, such as “Life is Beautiful” (1997), but there may also be others, which do not immediately make you weepy, but which through their moving ending or the heartfelt relationship/chemistry between characters, make you also want to cry. “Head in the Clouds” is such a film for me. It is a very underrated romantic drama set on the eve of the WWII, telling of a rich heiress Gilda Bessé (Charlize Theron), who refuses to face reality while being surrounded by her friends Guy (Stuart Townsend) and Mia (Penélope Cruz).

Read more of this post

“The Age of Innocence” Review

age_of_innocence_xlg

The Age of Innocence (1993)

Martin Scorsese once said that “The Age of Innocence” was the most violent film he had ever made. He was undoubtedly referring to the emotional torrents in the film, and, even though the film does not comes off as this totally perfect and touching romance, it still has many things to recommend it. Adapted from novel by Edith Wharton, the film pictures the 19th century New York’s delicate high society where manners and appearances take prime considerations. In the midst of it, lawyer Newland Archer (Daniel Day-Lewis) falls under the spell of the Europeanised and “exotic” Madame Olenska (Michelle Pfeiffer), finding himself in a love triangle, because he is soon to be married to the society’s belle, May Welland (Winona Ryder). Violent passions raging within the high-fenced societal constraints, almost tearing apart the delicate rules of order and innocence, is the film’s main theme. 

Read more of this post

“Indignation” Review

indignation-poster

Indignation (2016)

 “Indignation” is a directional debut of a screen-writer and producer James Schamus, known for adapting the script of “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon” (2000) and being the producer of “Brokeback Mountain” (2005). Adapting the book by Philip Roth, in “Indignation”, Schamus presents the life of Marcus Messner (Logan Lerman), a bright lad who, while working as a butcher in his father’s store in New Jersey, receives a prestigious scholarship to attend a college in Ohio. What follows is the depiction of Marcus’s troubles of fitting into his new college environment as he simultaneously tries to deal with his socially-unacceptable abhorrence for organised religion and with the confusion of his sexual-awakening. Schamus’s film is a particular kind of a film which is heart-breaking in individual scenes and bitter-sweet in its overall presentation, and the director manages to convey the story masterfully, paying particular attention to the character presentation and dialogue.

Read more of this post

“The Handmaiden” Review

the-handmaiden-poster

The Handmaiden (2016)

The Handmaiden” is an award-winning erotic psychological drama directed by Park Chan-wook (“Oldboy” (2003), “Stoker” (2013)). Based on/inspired by the novel “Fingersmith” (2002) by Sarah Waters, the film centres on a young maid, Sook-Hee, who arrives to the estate of an affluent book-lover, Kouzuki, to be a servant to his niece Lady Hideko. However, nothing is as it seems, because Sook-Hee’s main employer is actually a conman, self-named Count Fujiwara, who made a deal with the young maid to con Lady Hideko out of her inheritance. Fiercely intelligent and provoking, “The Handmaiden” does three things brilliantly: it toys cleverly with its audience’s imagination, and challenges its formed beliefs and visual interpretations; touches a sensitive nerve with its poetic and erotic imagery; and provides a stunning cinematic experience.

Read more of this post

“La La Land” Review

la-la-land-poster

La La Land (2016)

Universally acclaimed, “La La Land” is the kind of a film which could melt the most cynical and toughest of critics. As romantic as it is visually stunning, the main charm of the film lies in its simplicity: a guy, Sebastian (Ryan Gosling), and a girl, Mia (Emma Stone) both dream of a professional success in Hollywood, and first find true happiness in each others’ arms, before the practical realities of their chosen “star” professions separate them. With an uncomplicated plot and an absolutely stunning soundtrack, “La La Land” has all the appeal of an old musical, while keeping things interesting and original with notes of modern music, the showcasing of modern technologies and with the demonstrations of a competitive side of today’s Hollywood business. In “La La Land”, Damien Chazelle (director) shows that, in 21st century, you can still not only make a financially successful old-school musical-comedy film, but also produce a real gem of a movie capable of leaving the audience breathless with its heart strings’ pulling and sheer inventiveness. 

Read more of this post

Comics Grinder

comics, pop culture and related topics

The Film Fanatic

Not Another Film Blogger

Musings of a Grouch

The insane ramblings of Chris Scott

Karavansara

East of Constantinople, West of Shanghai

indiescifi451.wordpress.com/

îndependent science fiction movies, reviewed and dissected ruthlessly.

The Uncharted Word

My World of YA Book Reviews || Ramblings || and Works in Progress

50 Year Project

My challenge to visit 192 countries, read 1,001 books, and watch the top 100 movies

The Bookish Wanderer

A lifestyle & book blog for inspiration, reviews & laughs - best enjoyed with a good cup of coffee.