Luca Guadagnino’s “Suspiria” and Steve McQueen’s “Widows” Trailers

Luca Guadagnino (“Call Me By Your Name” (2017) and “I Am Love” (2009)) is rebooting Dario Argento’s cult classic of the same name, and from the many plot similarities, it can be described as a remake (despite what actors may say). There seem to be both similarities and differences in the presentation: the music hints at the original, but some visuals are innovative. My favourite element here will be Tilda Swinton as Madame Blanc, a clever cast. It will also be interesting to see her character’s antagonistic tension and relationship with the character of Dakota Johnson. My concern is that I hope the film will remain dark and provocative with nice scary jumps, and not become too ridiculous. I am also disappointed with the cast of Johnson. She seems to be good here, but my belief is that someone younger with more remarkable features should have been cast in the lead role. Since it is Luca Guadagnino, a stylish and thought-provoking presentation is guaranteed. The original material is also intriguing, so it promises to be a good film.   Read more of this post

Advertisements

Halloween Special: “Split” Review

split_ver4It is that time of the year again: time for trick-or-treating, pumpkin-carving, witches-watching and party-going! To celebrate the tradition which may date back to some ancient rituals of Celts, here is my review of the film “Split” from one of the front-men of the modern horror/thriller genre – M. Night Shyamalan (“The Sixth Sense” (1999), “Unbreakable” (2000), “The Village” (2004)). Also, to get you into the festive mood, you can check out my other reviews of horror films, all of them are listed here.

Split (2016)

This film is M. Night Shyamalan’s latest creation, which exceeded everyone’s expectations. Here, a man Kevin (James McAvoy) abducts three girls and holds them hostage in a building. Kevin suffers from a multiple-personality disorder, one of the most serious and rarest of all psychiatric illnesses. He has twenty-three different personalities, who compete for attention in his head, and the captive girls must race against time to free themselves before the emergence of the most frightening and uncontrollable twenty-fourth personality called simply “The Beast”. “Split” is very well-made, with the outstanding acting, especially by McAvoy, and a fascinating plot and topic. What about Shyamalan’s penchant for unbelievable twists, one may ask? Well, there are simply no twists, in a traditional sense of this word, or none to concern oneself when watching the film.

Read more of this post

“Mother!” Review

mother-main-poster1-larg

Mother! (2017)

<<<I took care not to reveal any specific spoilers, but some discretion when reading is still advised>>>

Darren Aronofsky’s “Mother!”….I am happy to report that there is no need for some mass panic. “Mother!”  may start slow, but it proves to be a very enjoyable “descent” into sheer madness overall. The initial story here is Him (Javier Bardem) and Her (Jennifer Lawrence) settling into a married life in a country mansion, until one couple (Ed Harris and Michelle Pfeiffer) become their pestering lodgers against the wishes of Her. Ironically, the main flaw of Aronofsky’s psychological horror film “Mother!” is that it is not his first film. If it were, it would have been a masterpiece of achievement. Instead, “Mother!” is just the “recycling” of the elements/tricks present in Aronofsky’s previous films. How does this affect this film, one may ask? Well, Aronofsky’s “recycling” of his ideas reduces the overall effect, impact and unpredictability of “Mother!” by as much as 80%. “Mother!” formula is quite simple to understand. The film is structurally and archetypically “Black Swan” (2010) + touches of some “over-the-top” home invasion and “Rosemary’s Baby” (1968). This is all to it. And, where it is not all, it also incorporates, quite evidently, Aronofsky’s artful orange-colour bursting creativity and philosophy we have all previously seen in “The Fountain” (2006) and biblical/allegorical references. The saddest thing here is that the film is quite entertaining and even brilliant in parts, and the premise would have been completely unforgettable had Aronofsky been more original in his work.

Read more of this post

“Get Out” Review

d179ab6d3d9c3105bf13d3963c311591

Get Out (2017)

Get Out” is one of the best-reviewed films of this year. It is a debut film of director Jordan Peele, and has a dedicated, up-and-coming cast to match the film’s ambition. In this film, which is part psychological horror and part societal critique, Chris and Rose (Daniel Kaluuya and Allison Williams), an interracial couple, go to visit Rose’s parents upstate. It would be the first time that Chris meets Rose’s parents and he is visibly nervous. Soon upon arriving, Chris is overcome by the atmosphere of unease all around, questioning whether he is really that welcomed in the neighbourhood. Despite elements of brilliance in setting the atmosphere, unfortunately, the film strays half-way through from its initially brilliantly-presented social horror into some mediocre overt-hostility premise, and ultimately leads to a predictable and unimaginative ending.

Read more of this post

“Psycho” Review

pyscho-movie-poster

Psycho (1960)

**SPOILER ALERT**

This will be my 100th film review and to celebrate the occasion I thought I would review one of my favourite of psychological horror films – Alfred Hitchcock’s “Psycho”. Adapted from a novel by Robert Bloch, this film is a real classic of psychological horror genre, which practically revolutionised the way horror films were shot ever since its premiere. Relatively innovative in how it presents the characters, story and the ending at that time, Hitchcock’s “Psycho” is as suspenseful and frightening as it is entertaining, and is definitely a “must-see” for anyone who has even a slightest interest in the genre.

Read more of this post

“The Neon Demon” Review

neon_demon_ver3_xxlg

The Neon Demon (2016)

 “Beauty isn’t everything. It’s the only thing, says Roberto Sarno inThe Neon Demon. Director of this movie, Nicolas Winding Refn, seems to have taken this statement close to heart, and crafted a film where visual beauty is, indeed, the only thing worth paying any attention to, seemingly forgetting that, in film-making, visual representation is never the only thing that counts. Refn (also director behind critically-acclaimed “Drive” (2011)) is now here also the writer, and his story is about Jesse (Elle Fanning), an underage aspiring model, who comes to LA to try her luck in show-business. After gaining initial success, Jesse realises that the climb to the top is thornier than she had previously imagined it to be, especially when a group of fellow models start to covet her natural attributes and instantaneous success. Despite its outstanding visual effects and a promising premise, “The Neon Demon” is preposterous and misguided, that kind of a film which one can easily stop watching half way through, never really caring about the ending.

Read more of this post

The current state of horror: Sequels and remakes are still in

Despite the occasional flash of inspiration, the horror genre still seems reliant upon countless remakes and sequels.

By James Thompson 

The horror genre is one I could talk about for days on end; the iconic characters we have seen through the years, the classic films and the cornerstone actors who have stuck to their chosen traits. It’s one genre that certainly has a rich history but in its recent years is suffering from an overabundance of sequels and remakes.

So much so that the genre is indeed oversaturated with these entries. Admittedly you could look back at the likes of ‘Friday The 13th’, ‘Halloween’ and ‘A Nightmare On Elm Street’ to find copious sequels but you would have thought by now that this would have become a thing of the past – wrong.

Read more of this post

Pint of cinema

Drinking cocktails and going to the pictures

Cary Grant Won't Eat You

Classic movies for phobics

The Opinionated Reader

I am as stubborn as it gets, but I'm a good soul...really...

My Midnight Musing

Living Between the Lines

The Bit-C Blog

Movie and Television Series Reviews

Busy K Blog

You must do the things you think you cannot do. - Eleanor Roosevelt

Jon Spencer Reviews

Reviews From Anime to Board Games, and More!

OTAKU LOUNGE

Come chill on the couch.