“25th Hour” Review

25th Hour Film Poster 25th Hour (2002)

Today (11th September) marks 18 years since the 9/11 terror attacks in New York, USA, and I thought I would review a movie that incorporates the post-9/11 atmosphere – Spike Lee’s film 25th Hour – as a tribute so that we never forget what happened and what it meant. Spike Lee (Do The Right Thing (1989), BlacKkKlansman (2018)) based his film on a book by David Benioff that tells of Montgomery “Monty” Brogan (Edward Norton), a man with a criminal history, who has just one day to enjoy his freedom before he goes to jail for seven years for drug-related offences. We follow Monty on this day, as he reflects on his past and the mistakes he had made in his life. With the beautiful score by Terence Blanchard, 25th Hour is a film that showcases the post-9/11 grief and anxiety to the fullest, while also demonstrating the extent people are pushed to lead a better life. Copying with grief and coming to terms with tragedy and one’s life mistakes are just some of the issues explored. 25th Hour may be too long, not entirely cohesive and thin plot-wise, but, with its vivid images, it somehow seems to speak directly to one’s heart and soul, being a film about hope, guilt and attempts at redemption, making it somehow very significant.  Continue reading ““25th Hour” Review”

Philip Seymour Hoffman (23 July 1967 – 2 February 2014)

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‘My passion to develop as an actor didn’t have anything to do with people knowing me. I had no idea that would happen. To become famous, to become a celebrity is something that I thought happened to other people’ (Philip Seymour Hoffman).

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“Moneyball” Review

Moneyball (2011)   

Based on Michael Lewis’s book of the same name; directed by Bennett Miller; and also starring Philip Seymour Hoffman, ‘Moneyball‘ tells the story of Billy Beane (Brad Pitt), a very ambitious general manager of Oakland A’s baseball team. Beane desires to see his team at the top of every league game, winning the World Series, but, due to the financial constraints, cannot realise his dream. Therefore, hiring a Yale economics graduate, Peter Brand (Jonah Hill), Beane uses statistical analysis, measuring in-game activity, to choose his team players. The players picked by Beane are those “undervalued” by others, even though they show a promising talent. Beane’s main premise here is that everyone in baseball asks “wrong questions”, for example concentrating on players’ usual winning record and subjective opinions of a player, rather than asking such objective questions as “which player on a particular team contributed the most to the team’s offense?” These are the principles of subermetrics or “baseball economics”. As Wikipedia states, sabermetrics is “concerned both with determining the value of a player or team in current or past seasons and with attempting to predict the value of a player or team in the future”. 

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