My 5 Favourite Films of 2018

This is my list of five favourite films of 2018, and most of those below I also consider to be the best films of 2018. Please note that I have not yet seen Alfonso Cuarón’s “Roma”, Nadine Labaki’s “Capernaum” or Peter Farrelly’s “Green Book”. There is a big chance I would have equally enjoyed either or all of them.  

the favourite posterI. The Favourite (2018)

Yorgos Lanthimos (“The Lobster” (2015), “The Killing of A Sacred Deer” (2017)) is one director who does not shy away from shocking film displays or enigmatic and displeasing film content. This time he is not a screenwriter and is rendering a period drama in his own style. “The Favourite“, which was nominated for 10 Academy Awards, subverts one’s expectations about what a period drama should be, while it also makes one think deeply about the kind of characters that could exist in the world governed through ruthless power and self-interest. The unbelievably powerful performances from three leading ladies (Colman, Weisz and Stone) ensure the film’s high quality, while its unusual, curious camerawork has all the trademarks of its experimentally-minded director. Everything revolves around Queen Anne (Colman) here, and the story just loves to ridicule the excesses and extravagance of the royal court, as well as the fierce competition for one kind of “power” among the ladies closest to the Queen. The film works brilliantly as this exaggerated satire, which sometimes slides into deliciously-morbid and fascinatingly-obsessive character portrayals. I would have preferred the ending to be clearer in its message, but otherwise this film was just great as it is. My score: 9/10   Continue reading “My 5 Favourite Films of 2018”

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Late Afternoon: Oscar-nominated Short Animation

Late Afternoon” by Louise Bagnall is this year’s Academy Awards nominee in the category of “Best Short Animation”. I somehow prefer it over other nominees, and the frontrunners for the award are considered to be Pixar-produced animation “Bao” and Pixar-related short “Weekends“. Other nominees are touching “One Small Step” and the hilarious and witty “Animal Behaviour“. Normally I enjoy intricate, detailed animations, but, in the case of “Late Afternoon“, I somehow appreciate the simplicity and like how the animation incorporates the concept of memory. Have you watched this year’s nominees yet? Do you have a favourite?

“The Wife” Review

the wife poster The Wife (2018)

There is a saying that behind every successful man there is a woman, and “The Wife” exemplifies this saying like no other film. More often than not, society concerns itself with appearances, and people often only see what the façade presents – be it in relation to a relationship or a family. What is going on behind closed doors or what people may feel inside may be another matter altogether. “The Wife” is just that thought-provoking film that deals with this and other issues. Based on a novel of the same name by Meg Wolitzer, the movie is about a married couple Joe and Joan Castleman (Jonathan Pryce and Glenn Close) who receive rather exciting news – Joe is to be given a Nobel Prize for Literature. The duo, together with their son David, travel to Stockholm to receive this honour, and while there, both Jo and Joan experience a crisis of faith, and one big secret of their lives comes dangerously close to being unravelled. The film has its faults, but Glenn Close’s performance ensures that the film is sincere and convincing. If the first part of the film is this slightly mysterious story of whether there is something wrong in the happy marriage and the professional lives of Joe and Joan, than the second half is all about unsaid things emerging and letting themselves be known.

Continue reading ““The Wife” Review”