“Perfect Blue” (1997) vs. “Black Swan” (2010): Is Aronofsky’s Black Swan Perfectly Blue?

perfect-blue-movie-poster-1997-1010247694affiche_black_swan_by_linds37-d3fp171

Darren Aronofsky’s 2010 featureBlack Swan” is an Academy Award-nominated film, telling the story of a young ballerina Nina Sayers, whose transformation from a shy ballet dancer to a leading heroine ballerina of Tchaikovsky’s “Swan Lake” production causes a psycho-sexual breakdown. “Perfect Blue” is a lesser known 1997 Japanese animated movie based on a novel by Yoshikazu Takeuchi, telling the story of Mima Kirigoe, whose rapid descent from an admired pop-idol into a “tarnished” rookie actress has disastrous consequences.

In this piece, I will compare the two films closely, arguing that the two films share substantial similarities in terms of the plot, character, style, design, execution and the little details, pointing to the conclusion that the very underrated “Perfect Blue” was – at the very least – the direct and main inspiration for “Black Swan” (and even something much more than that), though Aronofsky himself denied the claim. Going further, the similarities are so striking that it could even be said that Aronofsky essentially re-made “Perfect Blue”, but changed the setting to a ballet, and re-modelled some characters, disguising them as others. 

Read more of this post

“Black Swan” Review

Black Swan (2010)   

**SPOILER ALERT**

Directed by Darren Aronofsky, ‘Black Swan’ is an ambitious film promising to submerge one into the world of classical ballet, a game of sexual seduction, hallucinatory experiences and pure psychological delirium, but did it deliver?

Read more of this post

The Academy Awards 2011

With the Academy Awards 2012 nominations coming up in January 2012, I thought I would share my thoughts on the Academy Awards 2011. I will focus on the “Best Picture” and “Best Actress in a Leading Role” categories. 

As is well known, ‘The King’s Speech’ won the “Best Picture” Academy Award 2011, and other runner-ups were ‘Black Swan’, ‘The Fighter’, ‘The Kids Are All Right’, ‘True Grit’, ‘Inception’, ‘Toy Story 3’, ‘Winter’s Bone’, ‘The Social Network’ and ‘127 Hours’.

It could be argued that ‘The King’s Speech’ won the “Best Picture” Award not because it represents some exceptional cinematographic achievement, but simply because it had no real serious competitors in that year. To put it simply, ‘The King’s Speech’ won the “Best Picture” Award not because it was so good, but because other films in its category did not conform in any way to the Oscars’ ideas of what the “Best Picture” winner should look like. That “ideal” was set in the past. Though such a state of affairs happens at the Oscars every year, I would argue that the year of 2011 has seen some of the worst examples of cinematography compared to the past thirty years, with the Academy Awards’ standards falling the lowest since the early 80s.

Read more of this post

ming movie reviews

in about 100 words or less

Film and TV 101

with Kira Comerford

The Movie Nerd Strikes Back

Impressive. Most impressive.

The Immortal Jukebox

A Blog about Music and Popular Culture

Reel Infatuation

Reel Stars*Reel Crushes

Raistlin0903

Michels Book/Boardgame/Movie review Blog

CineSocialUK

Up to the minute, fair, balanced, informed film reviews.