“Housing” Films: “99 Homes” & “House of Sand and Fog”

99 Homes Poster99 Homes (2014)

This film is set in the background of the 2008 housing crisis in the US when many Americans lost their homes. Andrew Garfield (Silence (2016)) is Dennis Nash, a single father, who loses his home to the bank and has a chance to get it back if he starts working for a real estate broker (Michael Shannon (The Shape of Water (2017)) who is “responsible” for his misfortune. Directed by Ramin Bahrani, who dedicated the movie to film critic Roger Ebert, the film is a great “housing” drama elevated by the performance from Michael Shannon. 99 Homes explores interesting moral dilemmas and issues, and is so powerful that could rightly be claimed as one of the best films of the year 2014.

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“The Shape of Water” Review

the-shape-of-water-french-movie-posterThe Shape of Water (2017)

Words lie, but looks don’t…When you fall in love, you fall in love, absolutely, all at once, all-in. It’s a miracle” (Guillermo del Toro).  

“Unable to perceive the shape of You, I find You all around me. Your presence fills my eyes with Your love, It humbles my heart, For You are everywhere” .

This tale of unlikely love between the Princess without Voice or Elisa and the creature from the Amazon has been nominated for thirteen Academy Awards, including Best Picture, and there are good reasons for this furore. Mexican director Guillermo del Toro (“Pan’s Labyrinth” (2006)) has finally made the movie he wanted to make for a long time. Del Toro merges different cinematic genres (fantasy, drama and romance), while paying tribute to black-and-white Hollywood musicals and B-movie monsters, to produce a movie which is almost faultless in its directional execution, acting and emotional content. The director draws on a number of sources to tell the unlikely love story which, among many other things, portrays and sympathises with the lives of the “underdog” minority, and engagingly sets out the high-pressure conditions of living in the times of the Cold War. 

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“The Shape of Water” Trailer

Previews: “The Current War”, “The Mountain Between Us” and “Flatliners”

The Current War PosterThe Current War (2017)

Story: The late 1880s. Thomas Edison (Benedict Cumberbatch) and George Westinghouse (Michael Shannon) compete for the power to supply sustainable electricity system to the masses. While Edison is the main inventor behind the system, promoting the direct current model, his rival Westinghouse had his own ideas about the system, vouching for the alternating current model, even though it was deemed dangerous at that time.

Director: Alfonso Gomez-Rejon

Leads:  Benedict Cumberbatch and Michael Shannon

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“Nocturnal Animals” Review

the-internet-s-best-design-talents-have-created-some-stunning-nocturnal-animals-poster-art

Nocturnal Animals (2016)

After directing critically-acclaimed “A Single Man” back in 2009, Tom Ford has decided to try his hand in directing something darker and more complicated, an adaptation of the novel by Austin Wright “Tony and Susan”. “Nocturnal Animals” is a drama/thriller containing two stories running in parallel: one in which Susan (Amy Adams), an art gallery owner, receives a manuscript from her ex-husband, Edward (Jake Gyllenhaal) and the impact that his forthcoming novel has on her; and another one in which the story in Edward’s manuscript is told. In that story, Edward and his family are fighting off the deadly advances of a gang on the way to their vacation, and the result of their on-the-road struggle is a horrific crime and a painful detective work. 

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“Complete Unknown” Trailer

“Revolutionary Road” Review

Revolutionary Road (2008)

**SPOILER ALERT**

‘…The nice young Wheelers on Revolutionary Road, the nice young revolutionaries on Wheeler Road…’ (John Givings in ‘Revolutionary Road’).

This is not the most famous line from Richard Yates’s critically-acclaimed novel ‘Revolutionary Road’, but one of my favourite ones. The 2008 film adaptation of this novel, directed by Sam Mendes, though deemed by critics as “something way too much coming way too late“, is nevertheless, a brilliant, underrated drama set in the mid-1950s in Connecticut, USA.

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