Looking Back: 10 Oscar Injustices of 2017

Since we are still on the topic of the Academy Awards, I thought I would present 10 most unbelievable and unforgiving injustices committed by the Academy Awards for the year 2017. In no particular order:

your-name-movie-poster-2016-10107772341. “Your Name.

Rumours have it that “Your Name” now has the distinction to be the highest grossing anime film in history, suppressing the old record set by “Spirited Away” (2001). And, it is no wonder, Makoto Shinkai has crafted something truly unique and memorable. The story of two teenagers swapping bodies randomly at night has everything which any anime could desire to have: a moving long-distance romance, background of an cataclysmic event of cosmic significance and breath-taking visuals, among other things. But, no, in 2017, the Academy simply chose to shut its eyes and pretend this masterpiece does not exist. 

 2. Rebecca Hall for “Christine” christine

Rebecca Hall’s performance in “Christine” was simply staggering it was so good. She gave the performance of her career as a nervous and depressed worker for a TV station in the US, portraying a real life character too, but was ignored for a nomination. One may say that the Best Actress category is always very competitive, but the Academy also has this penchant for favouring films which feature in the Best Picture category in all other categories, and “La La Land” is no exception. Besides, if the Best Picture nominations have been expanded to 10, perhaps, it is time to expand the number of nominations in other categories?

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“Florence Foster Jenkins” Review

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Florence Foster Jenkins (2016)

– “Was everyone laughing at me the whole time?” (Florence)

– “I was never laughing at you.” (St. Clair)

Directed by Stephen Frears (“The Queen” (2006) & “Dangerous Liaisons” (1988)), “Florence Foster Jenkins” is a comedy based on a true story[1] of Florence Foster Jenkins (Meryl Streep), a New York socialite whose desire to be a well-known opera singer greatly surpassed her natural abilities.[2] Unaware that she has a very poor singing voice and hearing, Madame Florence Foster Jenkins embarks on the career of a professional opera singer, hiring a talented young pianist Cosmé McMoon (Simon Helberg), and relying for encouragement on her devoted “common-law” husband St. Clair Bayfield (Hugh Grant). Knowing how much music matters to his partner, St. Clair manages to keep the appearances of Florence having vocal potentials often enough, or maybe until the time Florence gives a thousand tickets to soldiers to come and hear her live at the Carnegie Hall, a large prestigious music venue in the centre of New York. “Florence Foster Jenkins” is the kind of a movie one is happy to have watched: it is funny in its individual scenes, and melancholic and moving in its overall presentation; Meryl Streep’s Florence is breath-taking, and Hugh Grant gives the performance of his career. 

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