“Midsommar” Review

Midsommar Poster.jpg Midsommar (2019)

Ari Aster takes horror to a completely new level in his latest film Midsommar. Inspired by The Wicker Man and horror folklore, this film tells of Dani (Florence Pugh) who reluctantly decided to accept an invitation and go with her boyfriend Christian (Jack Reynor) and his friends to a festival that celebrates a midsummer in Hårga, Sweden (originally, the Midsummer Festival was a pagan holiday to commemorate the arrival of summer). On location, we, through the unsuspecting group of friends, slowly become immersed in the odd ways of life in this rural village in Sweden, slowly discovering its strange residents and their disturbing rituals. Welcoming and friendly villagers are only too happy to show their visitors around, as well as introduce them to their traditional midsummer celebration, but will our group of friends, as well as we, the audience, stomach what the villagers prepared for them and presented on their silver plate? In this gripping, “hallucinatory” film, we soon discover that, for the emotionally-vulnerable Dani, the stage has already been set for a showdown of her life.  Continue reading ““Midsommar” Review”

“Midsommar” Trailer

From Ari Aster, director of impressively disturbing Hereditary (2018), here is the trailer to the new horror movie Midsommar. The plot is about a group of friends who travel to a small village in Sweden for a festival that only occurs once every ninety years. The film stars Florence Pugh, who impressed in Lady Macbeth (2017), as well as Will Poulter (The Little Stranger (2018)), Jack Reynor and William Jackson Harper. For my list of great films about cults, see here.

10 Oscar Injustices of 2018

If last year the Academy Awards ceremony surprised us all with an unbelievable envelopes’ swap, and hence, provided a lot of entertainment as a result, this year the Academy Awards had the distinction to be so predictable as to verge on absolute boredom. I am glad though that “The Shape of Water” won the Best Picture Award and that “Coco” was considered the Best Animation. However, the question still remains – what injustices the Academy committed this year? What great films and performances it unjustly ignored? The following films, scripts and performances were arguably so good that they should have been acknowledged.  

florida-project (1)1. “The Florida Project

First of all, the fact that “The Florida Project” was not among the Best Picture Oscar nominees is one of the greatest Academy Awards’ injustices. This movie was just one of a kind: emotional, inspiring, insightful. Sean Baker has done a tremendous job with a relatively small budget, and the acting was excellent, especially from little star Brooklynn Prince and from Bria Vinaite. The movie was not only well-made, it has a social importance, and, yet, the Academy only nominated Willem Dafoe in the category of the Best Supporting Actor. “The Florida Project” is such a great movie that the Academy should have nominated it not only in the category of the Best Picture, but Sean Baker should have also received his Best Director nomination.    

jWlXk4e2. “Blade Runner 2049”  

For all intents and purposes, “Blade Runner 2049” is the movie of great significance cinema-wise. It was ambitious enough to break from many previous cinema traditions and risked a more thought-provoking, nuanced and aesthetic look/approach. It is definitely the movie to show aliens out there what cinema is capable of here on Earth. It is true that the film’s length is worrying and its story is not that well thought-out, but there were certainly far worse Best Picture nominees in the past. All reason point to “Blade Runner 2049” being recognised in the category of Best Picture. “Get Out” was recognised in the Best Picture category as a mix of horror and social satire, so this science-fiction sequel should also had a chance to compete (on top of its Oscar tech nominations). 

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“Lady Macbeth” Review

lady_macbethLady Macbeth (2017)

This limited budget production film takes the story of Russian Nicholas Lescov “Lady Macbeth of the Mtsensk District” (1865) as its inspiration to set its own in rural England. Florence Pugh plays a vivacious girl Katherine who is forced into a loveless marriage of convenience with a middle-aged merchant Alexander Lester (Paul Hilton). Bored with her marriage and her duties, Katherine soon takes the liking to one of her husband’s employees, one Sebastian (Cosmo Jarvis), and the two have a forbidden affair in her husband’s absence. The drama unfolds when the lovers are called to account for their behaviour. Director William Oldroyd, relying on a praise-worthy script by Alice Birch, manages in this movie to convey the claustrophobia of a loveless marriage as well as the loneliness of a rural household which awake the feelings of rebellion in young Katherine. Florence Pugh gives an astoundingly good performance as the lady of the house, which could only be described as one of the very best of 2017.

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