“Youth” Review

Youth (2015)youth poster

One of my favourite actors – Sir Michael Caine turned 85 this week, and this is my belated opportunity to celebrate by reviewing one of Caine’s more recent films directed by the eminent Italian director Paolo Sorrentino (“The Great Beauty” (2013)). “Youth” is about Fred Ballinger (Caine), a retired music composer who reminisces on his life while luxuriating at a health resort in the Swiss Alps. His old friend Mick Boyle (Harvey Keitel), an American film director, keeps him company, while his daughter Lena (Rachel Weisz), who suffers from a relationship break-up, prompts Fred to re-examine his past familial relationships. A very much Sorrentino film, “Youth” may not reach the heights of Sorrentino’s “The Great Beauty“, but it is still an interesting examination of a life past with some great acting as well as breathtakingly beautiful vistas on display.    

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“The Florida Project” Review

florida-project (1)

The Florida Project (2017)

Sean Baker, director of “Tangerine” (2015), has produced something special – a powerful, unforgettable film about the innocence, joys, freedoms and wonders of childhood played out in the context of social and economic exclusion in Florida, US. “The Florida Project” has been very unjustly ignored by the Academy in the forthcoming Best Picture Oscar race, an omission which is incomprehensible. “The Florida Project” is about a little girl Moonee (Brooklynn Prince) who lives with her young mother Halley (Bria Vinaite) in a simple motel with a big name “The Magic Castle” overshadowed by a large Disney resort. Moonee goes on happily with her daily activities full of wonder and mischief, barely registering the true hardship and deprivation which stalk economically-disadvantaged in the area.

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The O Canada! Blogathon: Xavier Dolan’s It’s Only the End of the World (2016)

It’s Only the End of the World (2016)

fid17267This is my second post for the amazing O Canada! Blogathon hosted by Ruth of Silver Screenings  and Kristina of Speakeasy (check out some of the amazing entries here). 

There I was…after twelve years of absence, and in spite of my fear, I was going to visit them. In life, there are a number of motivations…that force you to leave, without looking back. And there are just as many motivations that force you to return. So after all those years, I decided to retrace my steps. Take the journey…to announce my death.”  Such are the thoughts of a young man named Louis (Gaspard Ulliel) as he takes a plane journey to visit his estranged family after twelve years of absence. Louis suffers from a terminal illness, which means that death is at his doorstep. Few directors working today can convey the depth of emotion through a cinematic lense as masterfully as Xavier Dolan can, and “It’s Only the End of the World” is yet another film which is a proof of that statement. In this movie, Dolan demonstrates that he can exercise visual restraint, but “It’s Only the End of the World” still ends up being as potent, emotionally-moving and convincing as his previous work.

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The O Canada! Blogathon: Xavier Dolan’s Laurence Anyways (2012)

o-canada-i-confessRuth of Silver Screenings  and Kristina of Speakeasy are hosting the O Canada! Blogathon to celebrate all things Canada in film and TV, and I thought I would contribute because Canadian cinematography is close to my heart. It has always tried to be different and often experimented. Xavier Dolan, my choice for this blogathon, is no different. He is a Montreal, Quebec-born film director who produced his first major film “I Killed My Mother” (2009), that received numerous awards, at the age of 20, and who then went to direct five other award-winning films with his seventh film “The Death and Life of John F. Donovan” (2018) currently being in production. I will focus on two of his films: “Laurence Anyways” (2012) and “It’s Only the End of the World” (2016). 

Laurence Anyways (2012)

Xavier Dolan writes unusual films with equally unusual presentations, but his stories are always full of much humanity and bare human emotion, and, thus, they are always very relatable. “Laurence Anyways” is one of those movies. It is a beautiful and daring French-language film about the enduring power of love that trespasses the boundaries of societal conventions. 

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“Ingrid Goes West” Review


Ingrid Goes West (2017)


In this film by Matt Spicer the dangers of the social media usage are laid bare when a troubled girl Ingrid Thorburn (Aubrey Plaza) starts to stalk online a successful Los Angeles photographer Taylor Sloane (Elizabeth Olsen). With the inheritance that her mother left her, Ingrid moves to LA to realise her fantasy and be closer to her Instagram idol, and even finds ways to strike up a friendship with Taylor. Being anxious to please, Ingrid soon realises that it will take something more than a friendly talk or a shoulder to cry on to maintain the attention and interest of her idol.

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“Little Women” (1994) Review

little_womenLittle Women (1994)

It is Christmas eve, and while I want to wish all my readers a very Merry Christmas, I thought I would also review one of the films that could make Christmas all the merrier. In 1993, Gillian Armstrong (“Oscar and Lucinda” (1997)) directed just yet another, as everyone then thought, adaptation of the famous novel by Louisa May Alcott “Little Women”. Based on the true-to-the novel script by Robin Swicord (“Wakefield” (2016)), the film stars such great names as Susan Sarandon, Winona Ryder, Gabriel Byrne, Kirsten Dunst and Christian Bale. The story is about four girls of the March family and their modest, but interesting lives in times of the Civil War in the US. A very much Christmas movie, Armstrong’s “Little Women” perfectly conveys the heart-warming camaraderie of the four girls, telling of their lives’ ups and downs as they try to find their way in the world torn by hardship.

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“Still Alice” Review


Still Alice (2014)

Still Alice” is a film based on Lisa Genova’s 2007 best-selling novel of the same name and starring Julianne Moore in the role which landed her an Oscar for the best performance of the year. However, “Still Alice” is so much more than simply a demonstration of an interesting character study and Moore’s outstanding acting ability. It is a very important film, shedding light on a very misunderstood illness, and it was co-directed by the late Richard Glatzer, who was himself a sufferer of a motor neuron disease. The merit of the film lies in its ability to dramatise so well a story of one woman’s battle with an incurable illness, but do so so intelligently, delicately and movingly, the film becomes not only a powerful statement, but also an entertaining and totally engrossing watch.

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Steve J Donahue

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