“Blade Runner 2049” Review

jWlXk4e

Blade Runner 2049 (2017)

**SPOILER ALERT**

Denis Villeneuve’s “Blade Runner 2049” is already gaining the reputation of being a film which breaks new grounds in terms of creating visual splendour on screen, and its plot is a mix of cerebral reflections, unexpected turns of events and low-key, but effective action. While faithful to the world of the original film of 1982, “Blade Runner 2049” is really a film which is one of a kind, and in almost every respect. Here, it has been thirty years since Deckard’s adventures in “Blade Runner” (1982), and now planet Earth is even more depleted of its natural resources. The use of replicants on Earth increased, and now K (Gosling), a replicant police officer, is on the hunt “to retire” the older versions of replicants. However, one of his routine calls “to retire” has yielded important clues which may endanger the calm societal state whereby replicants and humans coexist relatively orderly. His adventure then becomes the one which involves the search for truth, and, like the original film, the preoccupation here is the issue of identity and the correct identification of false and true memories.

Read more of this post

Advertisements

“Blade Runner 2049” Trailer

This film from Denis Villeneuve (“Arrival” (2016)) looks promising: visually stunning and well-acted. But, I still have mixed emotions about it all. Will all the action and style here actually take precedence over depth and meaning? We will see.

“The Double” vs. “Enemy”

mmt702-medium-copy            enemy-poster1-407x600

The question of personal identity and its duplication have been fascinating people for centuries. From Edgar Allan Poe’s “William Wilson” to Tchaikovsky’s “Swan Lake”, the theme has been pervasive in almost every form of art. When it comes to movies, such films as “Sommersby” (1993), “Face/Off” (1997), “The Prestige” (2006) or “Black Swan” (2010) may immediately come to mind. However, just recently, scriptwriters/directors have decided to approach the topic more directly, and we now see two films – Denis Villeneuve’s “Enemy” (2014) and Richard Ayoade’s “The Double” (2013) gracing cinema screens in the hope to awe. Although these two movies have their share of differences, e.g., “The Double” is far wittier and more satirical than “Enemy“, these two films share the same theme, and, therefore, it may be interesting to make a brief comparison between the two. Also, besides the “doppelganger” theme, what these two films also have in common is the relative novelty of the directors’ productions. “The Double” is Ayoade’s directional debut and for Villeneuve, ‘”Enemy” is only his second truly mainstream movie after “Prisoners” (2013), also starring Jake Gyllenhaal (“Donnie Darko” (2001), “Zodiac” (2007)).

Read more of this post

annagoestoconcerts

Where I write about concerts and life's memorable events?

The Super Network

Reviews, Super Podcast, Wrestling, Conventions

Christopher Lindsay

Short Stories & Essays

Really Awful Movies

Horror Movies, Science Fiction, Exploitation, Action, Genre Films.

Sometimes Objective Reviews

Psychobabble, Reviews and Wrap Ups of a Film and TV Enthusiast

BOOKS AND CO.

“So many books, so little time.”

Not Left Handed Film Guide

"I am not left handed either."

Lindsay Acland

journalist & film blogger

Abbie watches stuff

Words about films, TV and more

The Schleicher Spin

"I never know what I think about something until I read what I've written on it." -- William Faulkner