“Silence” Review

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Silence (2016)

**SPOILER ALERT**

This is not the sort of film you “like” or “don’t like”. It’s a film that you experience – and then live with” (Matt Zoller Seitz).

…wandering here over the desolate mountains – what an absurd situation!…I knew well, of course, that the greatest sin against God was despair; but the silence of God was something I could not fathom” (Rodrigues [Endo: 90]).

Martin Scorsese’s 28-years’ “passion” project culminated in the film “Silence“, based on the acclaimed novel by Shūsaku Endō. The film is about two 17th century Portuguese Catholic priests, Father Rodrigues (Andrew Garfield) and Father Garupe (Adam Driver) who decide to travel to Japan in search of their former mentor, Father Ferreira (Liam Neeson), who, most believe, betrayed his holy cause in the foreign land. Touching on delicate moral and religious issues, the film is powerful both in its vision and in its message, achieving its desired cinematographic goal to awe, thanks to Scorsese’s dedicated and masterful direction, breath-taking cinematography and inspiring original material. Although the plot is uncomplicated and could even be considered “thin”, underneath every action and thought of the main character lies (and could be sensed) a myriad of contradictory emotions; culturally-divisive inner turmoil; and dormant causes for the later spiritual/religious re-awakening. 

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“Love & Friendship” Review

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Love & Friendship (2016)

“…the audience is being joyfully manipulated into liking…”

Love & Friendship” is a new movie by Whit Stillman and an adaptation of a short novel by Jane Austen “Lady Susan”. The plot is rather simple: 1790s; a recently widowed Susan Vernon (Kate Beckinsale), together with her American confidante Alicia Johnson (Chloe Sevigny), arrives to spend some days at her brother’s estate Churchill where she becomes the centre of spiteful rumours as a consequence of her past and present flirtations in accordance with her character. Soon upon arrival, Lady Susan submits to her charm the young bachelor of the estate Reginald DeCourcy. However, the matters are complicated further when Lady Susan’s daughter Frederica is brought to Churchill soon after, Frederica’s suitor Sir James Martin also makes his presence, and the situation of Lady Susan’s previous stay at Langford becomes clearer.  Read more of this post

“The Portrait of a Lady” Review

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The Portrait of a Lady (1996)

**SPOILER ALERT**

Directed by Jane Campion (‘The Piano’ (1993)), ‘The Portrait of a Lady’ is an adaptation of Henry James’s classic novel of the same name. It tells the story of a beautiful, free-thinking and intelligent young woman, Isabel Archer (Nicole Kidman) who arrives to England from the US with her aunt, Mrs. Touchett, to “see and explore the world”. While on her quest, Miss Archer rejects promising marriage proposals coming from a wealthy American tradesman, Caspar Goodwood (Viggo Mortensen), and an immensely rich heir, Lord Warburton (Richard E. Grant). Miss Archer takes these decisions because she is devoted to the ideals of personal freedom and a ceaseless pursuit of knowledge.Through the help of her faithful, but fragile cousin, Ralph (Martin Donovan), Isabel is made rich, and is then free to pursue her dreams of independence. However, when Isabel strikes up friendship with amiable and cultured Madame Merle (Barbara Hershey), she is far from suspecting that this acquaintance will lead to her unhappy marriage to an elusive, middle-aged art collector, Gilbert Osmond (John Malkovich).

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“Oscar and Lucinda” Review

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Oscar and Lucinda (1996)

‘Oscar and Lucinda’ is based on the novel by Peter Carey and tells the story of a young Australian heiress, Lucinda Leplastrier (Cate Blanchett) with the passion for glass and gambling who meets an Anglican priest, Oscar Hopkins (Ralph Fiennes), who has the same obsessions. The two soon strike up a close friendship, because they share the same trait of being quite unfit to live in the society as they know it due to their oddities and gambling compulsions. However, their increasing closeness soon puts to the test their obsession limits. This film directed by Gillian Armstrong (‘Little Women’ (1994)) is almost as odd and unique as its main characters. Rapidly going from comic to romantic, and ending up being tragic, the film covers almost every genre without losing its eccentricity. However, the film’s ‘strangeness’ and unusual style may be attributed to Carey book’s content and style. The book’s narrative is more factual than descriptive, and has many ambiguous paragraphs and references.

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