25 “Must-See” Biographical Films

In no particular order:

1.  Schindler’s List (1993)

2. The Aviator (2004)

3. Elizabeth (1998)

4. Gandhi (1982)

5. Milk (2008) 

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Studio Ghibli: “Only Yesterday” (1991) and “Kiki’s Delivery Service” (1989)

“…What drives animation is the will of the characters” (Hayao Miyazaki).

Only Yesterday” and “Kiki’s Delivery Service” are two completely different in plot animations, but both were produced about the same time by famous Japanese Studio Ghibli, an animation film studio known worldwide for the quality of their animations. While “Only Yesterday” focuses on grown-up concerns and largely targets teenager/adult audience, “Kiki’s Delivery Service” is a completely child-friendly movie, which also has important messages to deliver.

OYpostOnly Yesterday (1991)

Only Yesterday” has a plot filled with highly emotional undercurrents and intelligence: a 27 years old unmarried woman, Taeko, from Tokyo, visits countryside while reminiscing over her childhood of when she was a shy and creative fifth grader at school. Through her nostalgia, we get to learn about many situations which have had the biggest impact on her up until her present life, and get to understand her past choices, hopes and regrets. Directed by Isao Takahata (“The Tale of the Princess Kaguya” (2013) and “Grave of the Fireflies” (1988)), “Only Yesterday” is a beautiful animation which touches upon such often overlooked in films/animations topics as the “grip” of persistent childhood memories and their traumatic or positive impact on one’s later life and development, the benefit of re-discovering oneself in a different setting, the importance of staying true to oneself no matter the circumstances, and the imperative of letting go and forgiving “one’s former self”, as well as people from one’s past, to be able to carry on and lead a happy, fulfilled life.  Read more of this post

Dan Callahan: “Beauty and the Beast” flounders most on the miscasting of several crucial roles

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This is a review of “Beauty and the Beast” (2017) by Dan Callahan published here: http://www.thewrap.com/beauty-and-the-beast-review-dan-stevens-emma-watson-2017/. As for me, I cannot agree more. 

“The 1991 Disney version of “Beauty and the Beast” was perhaps the best and most melodic hit the studio had during its renaissance period for animated features, and it in turn spawned a long-running stage musical. This new mainly live-action Disney version of the often-told story directed by Bill Condon feels largely perfunctory. Where it flounders most is on the miscasting of several crucial roles.  Read more of this post

10 “Must-See” Films about Cults

In no particular order:

1. The Master (2012)

2. The Wicker Man (1973)

3. Rosemary’s Baby (1968)

4. Eyes Wide Shut (1999)

5. Ticket to Heaven (1981)

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The Academy Awards 2017

academy-awards-2017-here-is-the-full-list-of-nominations-for-oscar-2017-25-1485324839This has probably been the most dramatic and political Oscars in history, which will forever be cemented in the minds of everyone for its notorious Best Picture mix-up: La La Land was mistakenly announced as the Best Picture winner. What the producers of La La Land went through after the mistaken announcement no one should ever have gone through. It was a plain disrespect shown to the La La Land and Moonlight production crews. And, if the mistake was spotted immediately, as the organisers claim, why three La La Land producers, one after another, had all the time in the world to give their three humble and moving acceptance speeches? By allowing such an mix-up, the Academy (that should bear its responsibility alongside PwC) really debased itself. Irrespective, this year, the competition for the coveted Academy Awards was very high. Only in the Best Picture category we have had nine amazing films and each of them could be described as inspiring, moving and thought-provoking. However, I still consider Scorsese’s epic Silence and Amy Adams’s performance in Arrival the biggest snubs at this year’s Oscars. Here, I will comment on the winners in the following categories: Best Picture; Best Actress; Best Actor; Best Supporting Actress; Best Supporting Actor; Best Director; Best Cinematography; Best Animation; Best Foreign Language Film; Best Original Song and Best Original Score.  Read more of this post

“Hacksaw Ridge” Review

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Hacksaw Ridge (2016)

**SPOILER ALERT**

An inspiring story about an unconventional hero? A graphic tale of the brutality of a war? A touching and believable love story? Mel Gibson can do it all, and, believe it or not – do it brilliantly – all in the same movie. His latest film “Hacksaw Ridge” tells the true story of Desmond Doss (Andrew Garfield), a kind, deeply-religious young man who also happens to be a conscientious objector, enlisting to serve in an army, while having a deep conviction against the commission of violence/murder and would not even touch a gun. Nominated for six Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Actor and Best Director, “Hacksaw Ridge” is the kind of a film which one can easily define as “great”: a moving, heart-felt story is matched by a dedicated director and a committed actor who do their work exceptionally well.

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The Ultimate 90s Blogathon: Batman Returns (1992)

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Kim at Tranquil Dreams and Drew at Drew’s Movie Reviews are hosting this great blogathon titled “Ultimate 90s”, and I have decided to write an entry on Tim Burton’s “Batman Returns” (1992). It will be fair to say that I was practically brought-up on this film and, in many ways, this film reflects my understanding and experience of the 90s decade. Check out my review on Kim’s blogathon page or read it below!

batman_returns_poster2Batman Returns (1992)

Three years after directing “Batman” (1989), Tim Burton came up with yet another Batman film “Batman Returns”. Visually stunning and well thought-out, the film is about the rise to power of Oswald Cobblepot/Penguin (Danny DeVito), who has been hidden away and shunned by society for 33 years in the city of Gotham. In his quest to become the mayor of Gotham, Penguin is unwillingly helped by a dishonest businessman Max Shreck (Christopher Walken) as the Penguin’s freaky followers intermittently wreck havoc on Gotham to discredit the present mayor and eventually make it look like the Penguin is fighting crime. Meanwhile, Shreck’s shy secretary, Selina Kyle (Michelle Pfeiffer), finds out too much about Shreck’s illegal activities, causing Shreck to try to get rid of her, and the result of his efforts is Selina’s transformation into a Catwoman. Bruce Wayne/Batman (Michael Keaton) is also not indifferent to the crimes orchestrated by the Penguin and is determined to stop the Penguin and his gang while having a love-hate relationship with Selina/Catwoman. 

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