20 Unmissable Erotically-Charged Films

Some of these films do not contain nudity or contain only limited nudity. The references to eroticism/erotica and sensuality may be only subtle, but powerful. Incidentally, three of the below films are by a British director Adrian Lyne (“Jacob’s Ladder” (1990)) and two by a growing Italian master of subtle and powerful erotically-charged films Luca Guadagnino (“A Bigger Splash” (2015)). In no particular order:  

1.) In The Mood for Love (2000)

2.) Betty Blue (1986)

3.) Call Me By Your Name (2017)

4.) The English Patient (1996)

5.) The Handmaiden (2016)

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10 Popular Films that are actually Remakes

A number of remakes (new film adaptations) is coming soon or has already hit the screens, including “Murder on the Orient Express” (2017) and “Suspiria” (2018) (still to premiere), and “It” (2017) and “Flatliners” (2017) (already here). Perhaps, it is time to revisit/draw attention to some other in existence. While such remakes as “The Departed” (2006), “The Fly” (1986) or “The Italian Job” (2003) are relatively well-known, some others may just not be. So, without further ado and in no particular order:

MPW-932561. Original: Ocean’s 11 (1960) = Remake: Ocean’s Eleven (2001)

Ocean’s Eleven” (2001) is a popular fast-paced heist film directed by Steven Soderbergh (“Side Effects” (2013)) and starring such major names as George Clooney, Brad Pitt, Matt Damon and Julia Roberts. In the film, Danny Ocean (Clooney) assembles his team to steal millions from three casinos in Las Vegas: The Bellagio, The Mirage and the MGM Grand. Extremely entertaining and amusing, “Ocean’s Eleven” proved to be a great film overall, largely thanks to the clever script and the star-packed cast. However, “Ocean’s Eleven” is, in fact, a remake of the movie by Lewis Milestone (“All Quiet on the Western Front” (1930)) of the same name, i.e. Ocean’s 11” (1960). Here, Frank Sinatra plays Danny Ocean, and the story now echoes the remake, save for the fact that Las Vegas here is the old one, and all the technology employed in the 2001 version is, understandably, nowhere to be seen. That also means that both films differ in a way the teams do their job and rob the casinos. It looks now that few people will prefer the 1960 version to the 2001 one. “Ocean’s Eleven” (2001) not only has a more ironical and sharper script, its secondary characters received their full spotlight, something which could not be said for the 1960 version.  Read more of this post

Rome: 10 “Must-See” Films set in the City

Being a cultural and historical centre for centuries, Rome has always attracted leading cinematographers. In the 1950s and 1960s, Rome was considered the European “Hollywood”, embodied in the famous Cinecittà film studio that produced such epic films as “Ben-Hur” (1959) and “Cleopatra” (1963). To this day, this historic city remains the one to which filmmakers flock to: (i) showcase its main beauties and cultural delights, as is the case with “Roman Holiday” (1953), ““Plein Soleil” (1961), “My Own Private Idaho” (1991) and “The Talented Mr. Ripley” (1999); (ii) to ridicule Rome’s high society and decadent lifestyle, as in “La Dolce Vita” (1960) and “The Great Beauty” (2013); or (iii) to provide a setting for a grim, chaotic, (post-)war, almost apocalyptic scenario, as embodied in such films as “Rome, Open City” (1945), “Bicycle Thieves” (1948), “L’Eclisse” (1962) and “Il Conformista” (1970). 

I. Roman Holiday (1953)Hot-Sale-Roman-Holiday-Metal-Tin-Sign-20-30cm-Vintage-Metal-Art-Poster-Retro-Special-Bar

Directed by William Wyler (“Ben-Hur“), this tale about a princess who escapes from her tiresomely busy daily duties while in Rome only to meet and have a romantic connection with a journalist is fascinating, recalling in plot “It Happened One Night” (1934). In Rome, Princess Ann and Joe Bradley (Audrey Hepburn and Gregory Peck in their respective leading roles), go through the famous sights of Rome, including: meeting at the Roman Forum (more precisely at the Temple of Saturn and the Arch of Septimus Severus), where the Princess falls asleep; trying their luck at the Mouth of Truth (Bocca della Verita) at the Basilica di Santa Maria in Cosmedin; going past on a scooter by the Colosseum; having breakfast near the Pantheon; taking in the sun on the Spanish Steps; and attending the interview at the Palazzo Colonna.

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25 “Must-See” Biographical Films

In no particular order:

1.  Schindler’s List (1993)

2. The Aviator (2004)

3. Elizabeth (1998)

4. Gandhi (1982)

5. Milk (2008) 

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10 “Must-See” Films about Cults

In no particular order:

1. The Master (2012)

2. The Wicker Man (1973)

3. Rosemary’s Baby (1968)

4. Eyes Wide Shut (1999)

5. Ticket to Heaven (1981)

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20 Films with the Coolest Songs

The definition of “cool” is malleable and changeable. However, if there was one agreed definition, these films would have been real contestants in winning “The Coolest Songs in a Film” award. The list only includes movies with multiple “cool” vocal songs (with lyrics) and excludes animations. In no particular order:

  1. Pulp Fiction (1994) – “You Never Can Tell” by Chuck Berry;Girl, You’ll be a Woman Soon” by Urge Overkill; “Flowers on the Wall” by the Statler Brothers, etc.  
  1. Back to the Future (1985) – “Heaven is One Step Away” by Eric Clapton; “The Power Of Love” by Huey Lewis & the News; “Johnny B. Goode” by Mark Campbell (Chuck Berry), etc.
  1. Drive (2011) – “Nightcall” by Kavinsky; “A Real Hero” by College & Electric Youth; “Under Your Spell” by Desire, etc.
  1. Django Unchained (2012) – “Django” by Rocky Roberts & Luis Bacalov; “Freedom” by Anthony Hamilton & Elayna Boynton; “I Got A Name” by Jim Croce, etc.
  1. The Great Gatsby (2013)“Love Is Blindness” by Jack White; “A Little Party Never Killed Nobody” by Fergie feat. Q-Tip & GoonRock; “Over the Love” by Florence and the Machine, etc.  Read more of this post

Girl Power: 20 Great Book-to-Film Adaptations

This list features book-to-film adaptations where either the film director or book author (or both) was female. This list excludes Jane Austen & Bronte sistersadaptations [1] to draw attention to other novels/stories. In no particular order:

1)  To Kill a Mockingbird (1962): Harper Lee, author

2) The Virgin Suicides (1999): Sofia Coppola, director

3) The Talented Mr Ripley (1999): Patricia Highsmith, author

4) Chocolat (2000): Joanne Harris, author

5) American Psycho (2000): Mary Harron, director

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