Rome: 10 “Must-See” Films set in the City

Being a cultural and historical centre for centuries, Rome has always attracted leading cinematographers. In the 1950s and 1960s, Rome was considered the European “Hollywood”, embodied in the famous Cinecittà film studio that produced such epic films as “Ben-Hur” (1959) and “Cleopatra” (1963). To this day, this historic city remains the one to which filmmakers flock to: (i) showcase its main beauties and cultural delights, as is the case with “Roman Holiday” (1953), ““Plein Soleil” (1961), “My Own Private Idaho” (1991) and “The Talented Mr. Ripley” (1999); (ii) to ridicule Rome’s high society and decadent lifestyle, as in “La Dolce Vita” (1960) and “The Great Beauty” (2013); or (iii) to provide a setting for a grim, chaotic, (post-)war, almost apocalyptic scenario, as embodied in such films as “Rome, Open City” (1945), “Bicycle Thieves” (1948), “L’Eclisse” (1962) and “Il Conformista” (1970). 

I. Roman Holiday (1953)Hot-Sale-Roman-Holiday-Metal-Tin-Sign-20-30cm-Vintage-Metal-Art-Poster-Retro-Special-Bar

Directed by William Wyler (“Ben-Hur“), this tale about a princess who escapes from her tiresomely busy daily duties while in Rome only to meet and have a romantic connection with a journalist is fascinating, recalling in plot “It Happened One Night” (1934). In Rome, Princess Ann and Joe Bradley (Audrey Hepburn and Gregory Peck in their respective leading roles), go through the famous sights of Rome, including: meeting at the Roman Forum (more precisely at the Temple of Saturn and the Arch of Septimus Severus), where the Princess falls asleep; trying their luck at the Mouth of Truth (Bocca della Verita) at the Basilica di Santa Maria in Cosmedin; going past on a scooter by the Colosseum; having breakfast near the Pantheon; taking in the sun on the Spanish Steps; and attending the interview at the Palazzo Colonna.

Read more of this post

Gloves in Films: Hiding True Character and Desires

audrey-hepburn-breakfast-at-tiffanys-costume-wallpaper-2This will be my 200th post on the blog, and I thought I would do something different. I have always been fascinated with objects and their symbolic meanings in films, and some object-placements in films evoke powerful imagery and are open to different symbolic interpretations. On the face of it, gloves in films do not present a big conundrum: they can be worn for warmth; because of an unspoken societal rule/etiquette; as a result of a fashion trend; in the course of a professional pursuit, such as medicine or sport; or in the course of a crime. However, arguably, gloves may also sometimes have a more symbolic interpretation in a film, and represent a character’s “camouflaged”/hidden true intention or desire, or emphasise a character’s subconscious attempt to distance him(her)self from others, hiding their true character.

Read more of this post

“Lady Macbeth” Trailer

Trash Film Guru

Bringing 42nd Street Into Your Living Room --- Where It Belongs!

Prestridge²

Independent journalism on the things we love - money, film and the arts

johnrieber

Burgers, Bacon, Music, Movies, Offbeat Adventures & Exploitation!

Forgotten Films

A look at the movies forgotten by time

That Other Critic

Reviews, critiques, and comedy.

Bad Movie World

No Budget? No Talent? No Problem.

Hill towns of Le Marche, Italy

An Englishwoman's personal take including art, architecture, churches, food, drink, advice to tourists on how to survive and the ups and downs of owning a second home.

I Don't Make the Movies, I Just Watch Them

I need an outlet to express my many opinions on various films. Ah, bless you Internet.